Pyramid blogging

Hope it's more productive than pyramid sales! What's it all about? Not sure really, never tried it before, might never again, but it boils down to answering a set of questions from someone in your blog, and promising to ask a fresh set of questions of people who comment on your answers, should they agree to be interviewed themselves. Mr Nighttime describes it as an 'interview meme', and these are my responses to his questions...

1. What would you consider your dream job, if you don't already have it?

I've never gained a whole lot of pleasure from salaried employment, but have been lucky to be able to work for many years in the voluntary sector alongside my paid employment, pretty much since leaving university - including ten years as a suicide counsellor, working with organisations providing opportunities for underprivileged kids to take part in sporting activities, running sports clubs for children, and more recently, involvement with an orphanage over in Thailand. All of these I have thoroughly enjoyed doing, and would be delighted to carry on, as long as I'm able and considered useful! If not, I'll just have to retire gracefully, it's a bit late for me to be thinking about dream jobs!

2. If you could only live the rest of your life on one type of food, what would it be?

Tropical fruits, especially mango and roseapple ('cham-poo', pronounced shamPOO)... I once thought fruit in Provence was in a class of its own compared to the bland-tasting British offerings, but after living in Thailand and demolishing platefuls of delicious and succulent fruits every day without fail, I'm suffering severe withdrawal symptoms now I'm back in France for a few months.

3. Have you followed your bliss in life?

I'm not quite sure what it means - is it an expression from across the other side of the Pond? It kind of sounds a bit self-indulgent. Following one's heart, or one's dream, perhaps? In fits and starts maybe, but life has a knack of setting obstacles in your path, and I've met one or two. Reminds me of a chat with a Buddhist monk and close friend who - when I told him how much I admired, even envied his state of tranquility and acceptance - told me how it would be virtually impossible to achieve as a lasting state in the world outside the temple... especially in my shoes! In the sense though that I've always done my own thing (worked for myself), regret few decisions that I've made (not least opting for quality of life over more materialistic goals and 'semi-retiring' aged 38 to concentrate on family and voluntary activities), I suppose I've 'followed my heart'.

Though to be honest, I've been following my dream for so long I'm beginning to wonder if I'll ever catch up with it ;-) Perhaps I should follow the Buddhist lead, and stop trying...

4. What is your idea of a peaceful Sunday morning?

Tough one - I can think of so many versions, no way I could fit them all into a single Sunday morning. A common theme would be all four kids not making demands on me for an entire half day... that would definitely be a first. Then I could spend an exquisite few hours reading a book uninterrupted, or perhaps spend a morning of quality time relaxing with my Thai partner who loves peace and quiet as I do... or take my dog for a long walk in the Provencal hills that are virtually deserted at this time of year, or in the French Alps in the springtime (photos below) - not forgetting my favourite Nikon D2X, in the hope of getting that mind-blowing photo of something entirely unexpected...

5. At what point do you consider mere acquaintances true friends?

When you intuitively know that they are genuinely trustworthy, and that the day you are down on your luck, they would do all in their power to help out. It's an increasingly rare occurrence with the ever more individualistic, achievement-oriented Western lifestyle we are led to believe is the holy grail of cultural achievement these days. One reason why I prefer living in South East Asia, where different priorities still hold sway.
______________________________

So... would you like to be interviewed?!

Just follow these instructions:
  1. Leave me a comment saying, “Interview me.”
  2. I will respond by emailing you five questions. I get to pick the questions.
  3. You will update your blog with the answers to the questions.
  4. You will include this explanation and an offer to interview someone else in the same post.
  5. When others comment asking to be interviewed, you will ask them five questions.
The perfect, peaceful Sunday morning... hiking springtime through the French Alps...

A fellow hiker takes time out...

Stunning scenery, climbing up to the Roselend Glacier

A choice of trails - you can walk for hours, and not see another soul...


add a comment

Stumble Upon Toolbar Add to Technorati Favorites

12 comments:

Susan said...

To follow your bliss is a phrase coined by Joseph Campbell, an American writer and philosopher who was very interested in native American stories and legends. I've always found him slightly irritating and sentimental and would make a similar pragmatic/realist comment as your Buddhist monk.

Memes, in the form used here, are a concept popularised by Richard Dawkins, who realised that the process did not only apply to biology and evolution.

The FrogBlogger said...

Ah, that would account for it - Joseph Campbell has never figured on my reading list. Richard Dawkins however has. I've read several of his books, including Selfish Gene, Blind Watchmaker, Unweaving the Rainbow, A Devil's Chaplain, and of course the inevitable controversial if popularist (and rather less satisfying than the others as a result) God Delusion.

JJ said...

Love the tiger pictures below.

Interview me, please. (4pmteatime (at) gmail (dot) com

Brian said...

I'm always game for a laugh and a little intrigued. So yes 'Interview Me' and lets see what happens.

Hoo Don said...

I would like to ask you a sixth question.

When you had your last Nighttime drink, was it a heavy session of wine and spirits alongside an evening of model making with cheap plastic parts and some very strong glue ?

The FrogBlogger said...

Martyn - is this a 'lost in translation' gag, are you in cynical frame of mind, or have you been using your strong glue in too confined a space? If none of the above, excuse me while I have a quick JD snorter and come back to your question from an alternative universe.

Hoo Don said...

I think you are more likely to find a fairy rather than a Pharoah in one of Mr Nighttime's Pyramid's.

Mr. Nighttime said...

Susan - you are simplifying things just a bit when it comes to Joseph Campbell. He was a professor of comparative mythology at Sarah Lawrence College in Bronxville, NY. While he did indeed have a deep interest in Native American stories, at the heart of his studies were the entire scope of human mythological systems. Both Buddhism and Hinduism played a large role in his academic life, as did the writings of Jung, Nietzsche, and many others.

He was also an advocate of both science and psychology. To simply classify him as a "writer and philosopher" is to short change him tremendously.

What books of his have you read?

Hoo Don said...

My apologies. I have dropped in on Mr Nighttime and his blog reads really well. I will change the fairy to Pharoah and slope off to eat my humble pie. My apologies to you Mr Nighttime.

Mr. Nighttime said...

HooDon - Apology accepted.

Susan said...

Mr Nighttime: well, now you've put me on the spot :-) Campbell and Nietzsche are the stuff of my early twenties, and I am now almost 50. Campbell never resonated well with me, although curiously Nietzsche did. To be honest I can't now tell you which works by either of them I have read, without looking them up, and even then I'll probably be a bit vague.

The FrogBlogger said...

My Nietzsche reading didn't go much further than Thus Spake Zarathustra ... I was much more a fan of the mainstream French existentialists in uni days - Sartre, Camus in particular. A loooong time ago for me too Susan, as you kindly reminded me recently!